ARE YOU READY

Among companion animals, dogs are unmatched in their devotion, loyalty and friendship to humankind. Anyone who has ever loved a dog can attest to its hundred-fold return. The excitement your dog shows when you come home, the wagging tail at the sound of the leash being taken from its hook, the delight in the tossing of a tennis ball, and the head nestled in your lap-those are only some of the rewards of being a dog owner. 


Owning a dog is not just a privilege-it's a responsibility. These animals depend on us for, at minimum, food and shelter, and deserve much more. If you are considering taking a dog into your life, you need to think seriously about the commitment that dog ownership entails. If you already have a dog, you need to consider if you are fulfilling all your obligations as its owner.


Cascade Northwest Bullmastiff Club is committed to helping dog owners raise happy, healthy dogs. This blog is certainly not exhaustive, but it contains some of the essential ways you can be the best dog owner you can be.

 

Please keep in mind- if you are reading these posts and find yourself thinking: "Maybe I'm not ready for dog ownership- this involves more than I thought- cat's are easier"  It's ok. Take more time.  There is nothing wrong with "waiting" to become more prepared- more sure.  We will welcome you to any events to be around the dogs and gain a better understanding glean important knowledge about so many things you may have not even thought of. 

<< First  < Prev   1   2   3   Next >  Last >> 
  • 07 Jan 2017 10:13 AM | Anonymous

    Respect Local Laws
    Heed the laws regarding dog ownership in your city or county. These may include registration, leash laws and nuisance barking laws. Failure to obey the laws in your area may not only result in the loss of your dogs, but may also infringe upon the rights of others in your area.  Find these out BEFORE you bring a dog into the family.

  • 07 Jan 2017 10:12 AM | Anonymous

    Don't Leave Leavings
    Always carry a plastic "baggy" or two with you when you walk your dog to pick up any waste it leaves behind, then dispose of the waste properly. Failure to clean up after your dog is disrespectful to your neighbors.


  • 07 Jan 2017 10:04 AM | Anonymous

    Provide Shelter
    Your dog needs a sheltered area for the time he spends outside. The shelter should provide shade in summer and warmth in winter.

    Watch the Heat

    Dogs can succumb to heat stress in a matter of minutes. Do not leave your dog in the car when the temperature is high. When your dog is outside, he should have a shady place to lay down and plenty of fresh, cool water.

  • 07 Jan 2017 10:03 AM | Anonymous

    Travel Safely
    Keep your dog safe in the car by using a crate, or by attaching the dog to a seat belt with a harness. Never let your dog ride free in the back of a pickup truck, or allow him to hang his head out of the car window.

    Find a Pet-Sitter or Boarding Kennel

    Make arrangements for your dog's care when you go away. Have a friend or reliable pet-sitter come over to tend to the dog, or find a good kennel for boarding. If you opt for boarding, try to inspect the facilities before you drop your dog off.

  • 07 Jan 2017 9:51 AM | Anonymous


    Be Alert to Changing Needs  As your dog ages, his needs will change. He may require a different diet, need more sleep, and be less active. Do what you can to keep him comfortable. Your dog may not be as "fun" as he once was, but he is the same dog you loved as a puppy. You should do everything you can to pamper him in his final years.



    End Suffering  
    If, due to illness or old age, your dog reaches a point where his quality of life is severely compromised, arrange to end his life humanely. Letting go is sometimes the kindest thing you can do. Don't prolong the suffering because you fear the pain of losing your dog.

  • 25 Apr 2014 8:24 PM | Anonymous member
    Vaccinate
    Dogs should follow a strict schedule of vaccinations to prevent diseases. Keep your dog current on his vaccinations, following the schedule recommended by your veterinarian. Keep a copy of your dog's vaccination records handy.

    Prevent Disease

    You can take steps to prevent other diseases not covered by the regular series of vaccinations. Depending on the area of the country you live in, your dog could be at risk for diseases such as heartworm and Lyme disease. Ask your veterinarian for advice on prevention.

    Repel Fleas and Ticks

    Aside from discomfort, parasites such as fleas and ticks can cause serious diseases. Keep your dog, his bedding, and your home free from parasites by using the method recommended by your veterinarian.


    1. 24 Apr 2014 8:19 PM | Anonymous member
      Bathe Your Dog
      A clean dog is a healthy dog. Bathe your dog on a regular basis appropriate to his breed and environment. Overbathing can be harmful to a dog's skin. Use a good shampoo and be sure to rinse well. If bathing your dog is more than you can handle, take him to a groomer or veterinarian for help.

      Groom Your Dog

      All dogs should be groomed regularly for health and best appearance. Some short-coated breeds need just a quick brushing every week, while some longer-coated breeds need daily brushing to prevent matting and to reduce shedding. If your dog requires clipping or sculpting, you may want to consult a professional groomer.

      Clip Those Nails

      Keeping your dog's nails short will keep him comfortable, prevent injury to his feet, and may save the surface of your floors. If you can hear your dog's nails click on a hard surface, they need to be trimmed. Ask your veterinarian for advice on clipping your dog's nails yourself or take them to a groomer, especially if they have dark nails.

      Clean Those Teeth

      To prevent tooth decay and gum disease, clean your dog's teeth regularly. Most dogs will accept a "toothbrush" if introduced to it slowly and gently. You can also give your dog products such as hard biscuits, beef tendons, bully sticks.  Do NOT ever leave a Bullmastiff unattended with a chew.
      1. 24 Apr 2014 8:15 PM | Anonymous member
        Know Your Breed's Health Risks
        You should be aware of common health problems in your breed, how to prevent them, and how to recognize their onset. For example, some giant breeds are prone to bloat, while some short-faced breeds are prone to respiratory problems. Ask your breeder or veterinarian for information about any signs or symptoms you should watch for in your pet.
        Be sure to visit our Health & Research Blog regularly.
      2. 24 Apr 2014 8:10 PM | Anonymous member
        Prepare for Disaster
        Be prepared to care for your dog in the event of a disaster such as fire, flood, hurricane or earthquake. Make an emergency kit with clean water, food, and first aid equipment. Find out in advance if the evacuation shelters in your area allow animals. If not, develop alternatives.

        Establish an Emergency Contact

        Enlist a family member or friend to take care of your dog in the event of a sudden illness, hospitalization or other emergency. This person should ideally be someone your dog has spent some time with and is comfortable with. Leave a list of general care instructions in a safe place.

        Make a Will

        You should make arrangements for the safety and care of your pet in the event of your death. Don't assume that a family member will step in to take care of the dog.
        1. 22 Apr 2014 7:56 PM | Anonymous member
          Your dog should wear an identification tag with your name, address and phone number at all times. This will increase the chances of your dog being returned to you if he is lost or runs away.


          Microchips are a method of permanently identifying your dog, and can be invaluable in recovering your dog should he become lost. You may wish to enroll your dog in AKC's affiliate, the AKC Reunite service, which is the nation's largest database of microchipped pets.


          Of course, you will want a picture of your dog to grace your desk or to send as a Christmas card. More importantly, a current photo will be invaluable in the event that your dog is lost.
        << First  < Prev   1   2   3   Next >  Last >> 

        Links to this website:  You may not create a link to any page of this website without our prior written consent. If you do create a link to a page of this website you do so at your own risk and will be subject to exclusions and limitations.   To request permission to link to this site send detailed email to: admin@bullmastiffnw.com

        Membership management and webdesign MLBD